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Back foot driver

This session is designed to improve your players’ ability to receive passes on the back foot. The term “back foot” is used to describe the foot farthest away from the nearest opponent. Once receiving the ball, players are encouraged to drive forward with the ball and attack.

What this session is about

  1.  Opening your shoulders to see both goals.
  2.  Receiving the ball on your back foot.
  3.  Driving forward to create and score goals.

What to think about

When your team is in possession, all players must open their shoulders because this will allow them to see both goals.

This will improve the vision of each player so they can see team mates and opponents.

In addition, this opening of the shoulders means players are now able to receive on their back foot, which will allow them to change direction when they have the ball.

Being able to drive forward with the ball will allow them to attack the opponent’s goal.

Set-up

Warm upSessionDevelopmentsGame SituationWarm Down
10 minutes10-15 minutes15 minutes10-15 minutes10 minutes

What you get your players to do

Mark out an area with two target goals at each end and use two teams. Each has one defender/setter and a line of attackers.

The defender/setter (S) passes to the first attacker (A1) on his team, who receives on the back foot.

The attacker must now drive forward into the opposite half of the pitch to try and score in one of the target goals.

The defender/setter (D), on the other team, is not allowed to defend until the attacker crosses the halfway line.

After this attack, the process is repeated by the other team. Defenders/setters go to the back of their line and are replaced by the attacker.

A setter (S) passes to an attacker (A1), who receives the ball on his back foot and drives forward to try and beat the defender (D).

A setter (S) passes to an attacker (A1), who receives the ball on his back foot and drives forward to try and beat the defender (D).


Development

Mark out an area with a five-yard channel across the centre and a goal at each end. This game scenario creates a 2v2 situation.

Two defenders and one forward go in each half. One midfielder goes in the central channel.

You, or an assistant, pass a ball to the midfielder who must receive it on his back foot and drive forward into one half to combine with his team mate in a 2v2.

After each attack, the midfielder replaces the forward with whom he played the 2v2. You can use two balls and two midfielders at once so both halves of the pitch are used at the same time.

Switch players’ roles so everyone has a turn at receiving on the back foot and driving forward.

An assistant passes a ball to the player in the centre who controls and drives into one half to create a 2v2.

An assistant passes a ball to the player in the centre who controls and drives into one half to create a 2v2.


Game situation

Split the pitch into three zones. Each team has two defenders in the defensive zone, two midfielders in the middle zone and one forward in the attacking zone.

The aim for the team is to build up play from the goalkeeper and the defenders in a 3v1 situation.

Then one of the defenders must drive forward into the middle zone to create a 3v2 overload.

Now one of the midfielders must receive a pass on his back foot to drive forward into the attacking zone to create a 2v2 attacking situation.

No long passes can be made from one end zone to the other and shots must be taken in attacking zones. The team that scores most goals wins.

Play must be built up through the zones and a player in each area drives forward with the ball to create an overload.

Play must be built up through the zones and a player in each area drives forward with the ball to create an overload.


What to call out

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